Wednesday, June 23, 2010

STITCHIONARY 5 Lace knitting



Vogue Knitting continues its wonderful series of Stitchionary books. This volume is number 5 and is devoted to lace knitting. I love the design and the color scheme of this volume. The colors are shades of blue and gray as you see on the cover and the photography is so incredible, that you see every stitch and feel that you almost can touch each swatch. When I look at these swatches I get inspired. I want to get my needles out and start working through these stitches thinking how it can be used in my next design.
There are 158 stitches and motifs that are broken by seven themes: easy/mesh, edgings, chevrons, allover, panels, combos, motifs. Each theme begins with the appropriate garment design published in the Vogue Knitting magazine that is featuring the type of stitches in that chapter. Each swatch has a written instruction and a chart, which is very helpful for visualization of the pattern. Some of us like to follow instructions, some like to follow the chart. I think it is a great approach to the stitch dictionary because it includes all of us. I am thinking about people who do not know English enough to read the given instructions and still being able to work with these charts. There is something else about the charts that I've found very helpful: the stitch key is given right there next to the chart instead of collecting them in one place at the beginning or the end of the book. It saves time and frustration to look for it. Since my background is European, I always thought that many American books are loosing some customers by not providing charts.
Needless to say, I was very happy to see that Carla Scott, the Editor in Chief of Knit Simple magazine, the Executive Editor of Vogue Knitting who is also the Editor of this book had this vision of including all of us and making this book very friendly. All chosen stitch patterns look very contemporary although we do know that they have been collected from old sources. This is a big accomplishment by the editor to be able to present these stitches in a way that we want to use them for our knitting now and keep the timeless craft alive.
In summary, this book is beautiful, very "Vogue" like, helpful, inspiring, easy to use and to learn from, and priced very reasonably.

Although I have every dictionary of stitches there is (at least I believe so) I am very happy to add this one to my library.
The photos were either provided by Vogue publishing or taken from the book.